Writing Scenes

Links

http://www.advancedfictionwriting.com/articles/writing-the-perfect-scene/

http://johnaugust.com/2007/write-scene

http://www.writersdigest.com/whats-new/10-ways-to-launch-strong-scenes

Summary

  1. Jump into the action right away. Don’t drag your feet.
  2. Hook readers with large surprises.
  3. Make the action relevant to your character’s personality.
  4. Act first, think later.
  5. Communicate information to the reader before the action.
  6. Reveal a character’s intentions that can’t be shown through action.

Questions

  1. Does the beginning have to include a lot of action, or can it lead to it?
  2. Can action be gradual?
  3. How can you reveal information about the character if the narrator isn’t omniscient?
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Plot

Links

http://www.creative-writing-now.com/what-is-plot.html

http://www.scribendi.com/advice/goldenrulesforagoodplot.en.html

http://www.how-to-write-a-book-now.com/plot-outline.html

 

Summary

  1. For there to be story, there must be flow and change. How to get from point A to Point B.
  2. The change can be the realization that nothing will change.
  3. Happiness is overrated.
  4. Stir up trouble; otherwise the plot will be dull.

 

Questions

  1. Can characters ever have a happy ending?
  2. How often does change need to occur?
  3. Is death a viable plot device?

Writing Dialogue

 

Links

http://www.writersdigest.com/uncategorized/writing-dialogue-the-5-best-ways-to-make-your-characters-conversations-seem-real

http://writetodone.com/10-easy-ways-to-improve-your-dialogue/

http://www.creative-writing-now.com/how-to-write-dialogue.html

 

Summary

  1. Make sure it fits with the personality of your character.
  2. Don’t make them speak in paragraphs. Less is more.
  3. Do NOT use dialogue as an information dump.
  4. If writing in an accent, don’t make it too heavy.
  5. Use simple dialogue tags.

 

Questions

  1. How much information should dialogue give?
  2. How often should there be dialogue?
  3. Can/should dialogue describe characters?

Editing

Links

http://www.dailywritingtips.com/how-to-revise-edit-and-proofread-your-writing/

http://www.sas.upenn.edu/irp/editing-tips-effective-writing

http://www.writersdigest.com/online-editor/how-to-edit-and-polish-your-writing

 

Summary

  1. Look at the surface. Does it look clean and well-written?
  2. Proofread three times for spelling and grammar.
  3. Uncover the clutter in the writing. Shorten paragraphs to keep them simple, yet interesting.
  4. Fill in the cracks.

 

Questions

  1. How could you determine whether or not the writing is wordy?
  2. How can you find out if the author had a writer’s block?
  3. How can you shorten paragraphs?

Endings

Links

http://www.writersdigest.com/online-editor/how-to-structure-a-killer-novel-ending

http://thewritepractice.com/ending-rules/

http://www.thecreativepenn.com/2010/08/09/how-to-write-the-ending/

Summary

  1.  “And they all lived happily ever after” is reserved for children’s fairytales.
  2. Surprises are good, but the reader must be satisfied.
  3. Don’t make it boring and pointless.
  4. You must accept that some genres have expected endings; the characters have to get together in a romance, lest the genre changes.
  5. Keep characters alive should you wish a sequel.
  6. Don’t forget to end the book, or explain that there will be a sequel. Tie up the loose ends.

Questions

  1. How long should the ending be?
  2. Should the ending come right after the climax?
  3. Should the death of a main character mark the end?

Setting

Links

-http://www.writing-world.com/fiction/settings.shtml

-http://www.tameri.com/write/setting.html

-http://www.writersdigest.com/tip-of-the-day/discover-the-basic-elements-of-setting-in-a-story

Summary

  1. Lay down the locale. Bad neighborhood? What are the buildings like?
  2. Time is important. What’s the time of year? Time of day?
  3. How’s the lighting and temperature?
  4. Decide on the geography.
  5. Were there ever any historic events there?
  6. Decide what the people are like there.

Questions

  1. How can the setting affect the story or characters?
  2. How long should you focus on describing the setting?
  3. When should you describe the setting?